NCC's mission team to Thessaloniki, Athens, and Corinth

Corinth!

(Due to internet issues, our final posts are going up late)

Team at Erastus inscriptionThe team woke up early on Saturday morning to continue our touring with Voula. Our first stop was the beautiful Corinthian Canal. We learned about the Diolkos — the road travelers used to drag their boats across the Isthmus so they wouldn’t have to go all the way around the peninsula. We visited the Diolkos, which was used from the 6th century BC to 1st century AD, on our way back to Athens at the end of the day.

After visiting the Canal, we then headed for Corinth. We toured the Roman Forum, took our places in the ancient starting blocks, and stood feet away from the Bema, or judgment seat – the one very specific place in Greece where it can be said with certainty “Paul was here” (see Acts 18:12). As we toured, we had a hint at just how good Paul was at communicating truth in the culture he was called to serve. His illustrations seemed to come alive as we stood amidst the ruins of Ancient Corinth.

As we stood at the bottom of the Acrocorinth, once the home of a Temple of Aphrodite, we learned about the immorality that was facing the Corinthian people. The issue of sex slavery that we have been confronting on this trip dates back very far in our history.

While at Corinth, we also saw the “Erastus stone,” an inscription that says Erastus the city treasurer laid the pavement at his own expense.  This is Biblically significant given that Erastus is mentioned three times in Scripture as one of Paul’s companions and specifically identified as the city treasurer of Corinth, making it clear that the inscription refers to the very same person.

We had another delicious lunch on our way to Mycenae. Our first stop was Agamemnon’s tomb, which dates back to the 12th century BC. We then headed up the citadel at Mycenae. Some of the ruins at the citadel date back as far as the 16th century BC — that’s old.

It was another incredible day with rich Biblical and ancient Greek history — a fitting end to our time in Greece.  We concluded the evening with a team dinner and debriefing, followed by an extremely early morning on Sunday for our flight back to the states.

Corinthian Canal

Corinthian Canal

Temple of Apollo

Temple of Apollo

Team in front of Temple of Apollo

Team in front of Temple of Apollo

Team in front of the Bema and Acrocorinth

Team in front of the Bema and Acrocorinth

Nicole and Andrea at Starting Blocks

Nicole and Andrea at Starting Blocks

Erastus inscription

Erastus inscription

Agamemnon's Tomb?  Or his dad's?

Agamemnon's Tomb? Or his dad's?

Diolkos

Diolkos

Lions Gate at Mycenae

Lions Gate at Mycenae

Jason at Mycenae

Jason at Mycenae

Luke and Ashley atop Mycenae citadel

Luke and Ashley atop Mycenae citadel

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